The Answer to How Safe is Your Ground Beef? is VERY!

Much is a buzz over the Consumer Reports article How Safe is Your Beef? where 300 samples of retail ground were analyzed for bacteria between grass and grain fed beef highlighting best results as “sustainable” beef.

When a CBS Morning News anchor asked Urvashi Rangan, Ph.D. & Executive Director for the Center for Food Safety & Sustainability at Consumer Reports, “Shouldn’t we suspect some bacteria in any beef?”, her answer was all telling, “Absolutely”. So, what’s the beef with ground?

Buedel Fine MeatsPictured above: Three different headlines tell the same story. Kudos to CBS News (center) for taking the high road!

Getting the Facts Straight

Let’s get one thing straight: all raw meat has bacteria on it. The North American Meat Institute (NAMI) documents the following:

1. Some of that bacteria [found in the report] such as certain types of Enterococci, are not pathogens and are actually beneficial like probiotics in yogurt. Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus are typically associated with time and temperature abuse of cooked products and generally come from contamination after food is handled. All bacteria, antibiotic resistant or not, are killed with proper cooking to the recommended temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

2. The bacteria identified in the Consumer Reports testing is not the bacteria that cause foodborne illness. Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and generic E. coli are commonly found in the environment and are not pathogenic bacteria, meaning they do not cause foodborne illness. The primary pathogens of concern in raw ground beef are Salmonella and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). These are not mentioned or reported in their findings.

3. The number one industry priority is producing the safest meat and poultry possible. This is done by focusing attention on bacteria which are most likely to make people sick, particularly E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. It is telling that Consumer Reports did not highlight finding these bacteria on products they tested as a strong indication of the overall safety of beef.

It’s also important to note Consumer Reports did not approach the industry for scientific data on the subject material nor make their data available to the industry for evaluation.

Safety in Numbers

Rangan went on to say, “The question here is, can we get it better?”

NAMI says the Consumer Reports data is staggeringly inconsistent with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA FSIS) data which shows that E. coli O157:H7 occurs at a rate of less than one tenth of one percent in ground beef products. This has been reduced 93 percent since 2000.

You’d think a 90+ percentage improvement rate should be something to talk about. But the report makes no mention of that, or the highly regulated nature of the industry when it comes to food safety to begin with.

Federal compliance via on site inspectors takes place daily in meat plants to ensure food safety rules and technologies used to destroy bacteria are all in place and working. Some companies, like Buedel, also add a third layer of independent audits to their safety protocols.

Between regulating agencies and the industry itself, what kind of ‘better’ is Ms. Rangan really angling for here?

Cause Reporting

Throughout the news segment, Rangan compared each study finding between conventional beef [grain fed] and non-conventional beef [“sustainable, organic, natural and grass-fed”] to demonstrate conventional beef always had more bacteria.

NAMI also points out the use of, “Organic, Natural and Grass-fed are marketing terms that are not an accurate indicator of either sustainability or safety. All beef production models can be sustainable. The path to more sustainable beef is to ensure that every beef producer is utilizing the resources available in their part of the country to the best of their ability – whether grass, grain or other locally-produced renewable feeds like distillers grains.”

A quick visit to the Consumer Reports Facebook page reveals an ulterior agenda:

Buedel Fine MeatsFor those of you who aren’t familiar, Consumers Union (CU), is the non-profit “policy and action division” of Consumer Reports – a magazine published by Consumers Union. CU describes themselves as, “an expert, independent, nonprofit organization whose mission is to work for a fair, just and safe marketplace for all consumers and to empower consumers to protect themselves.

Herein lies a huge problem for readers today, when cause masquerades as media.

To be an ‘expert’ in anything you need to have a deep command of the knowledge base on all fronts. This article is filled with quotes from Consumer Reports own department heads, Grass-fed cattle farmers, and an epidemiologist from the CDC.

There were no quotes from actual food scientists (federal or corporate) nor grain fed cattle farmers, food retailers, industry media, leaders, professional groups and the like. Talking to the Department of Agriculture should have been a slam dunk at the very least.

There is also no mention of the politically based Facebook post in the online published article either. Other than this social nudge: We urge you to #BuyBetterBeef and continue the conversation with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Vine.

Wrap Up

If you’re still not sure whether How Safe is Your Ground Beef? is a valued news or views piece, perhaps their article disclaimer will help:

Editor’s Note: Funding for this project was provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Any views expressed are those of Consumer Reports and its policy and advocacy arm, Consumers Union and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Pew Charitable Trusts.

The takeaway on this is threefold: 1) Food safety is alive and well in the beef industry. 2) Always cook your beef to 160°. 3) Beware of expert media crusading cause.

Additional Reads & Resources

https://www.meatinstitute.org/index.php?ht=d/sp/i/106823/pid/106823

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/data-collection-and-reports/microbiology/ec/e-coli-o157h7-year-to-date/ecoli-o157-raw-beef-testing-data-ytd

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/newsroom/news-releases-statements-transcripts

http://meatmythcrushers.com/myths/myth-grass-fed-beef-is-safer-than-corn-fed-beef.php

http://meatmythcrushers.com/myths/myth-superbugs-are-on-most-meat-and-poultry.php

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Chef Thai Dang │ Make It the Best Experience You Can

Embeya’s Chef/Partner Thai Dang just got back from celebrating the Vietnamese Lunar New Year with his family on the east coast. If the first two months of 2015 are any indication of what kind of a year it’s going to be, the months ahead will be no less than an epic whirlwind.

To date, Dang hosted the Chef’s Social industry voting event for the Jean Banchet Awards at Embeya, bore the filmed stress of a Check, Please! segment [all thumbs up], received the Jean Banchet Award for Best Restaurant Service and successfully sailed through the grueling pace of Restaurant Week and Valentine’s Weekend.

  On March 7th, Chef Dang embarks for Vietnam on a “Culinary Journey” he is hosting for  R. Crusoe & Son. In addition to sharing local foods, culture and history with the tour, he will also cook for the travelers and take them to his family’s home where one of his sisters still resides today. (Pictured above: Vietnamese Fruit Market.) Follow his journey all next month on Twitter: @ThaiDangEats.

You just got back from visiting with your family, do you cook for them?

I cook for events. It [the New Year] is to give thanks to your parents who gave you life and to your ancestors. We are influenced by Chinese traditions and also add Catholicism to it. I brought my wife, she’s Italian American, for the first time this year. She loved it and was surprised by all the activity – all the kids get envelopes with money inside. I have six brothers and three sisters, and all of them have 2-3 kids. In Vietnam, businesses shut down for three days, and people visit each other.

I get made fun of when I go home because my family says I lost my accent. I was 6 when I came here, but my siblings were in their teens – plus they’re around my parents and the community there. I have the English accent when I speak Vietnamese now – do you see it? When I have an in depth conversation with them, sometimes it’s hard to find the words. They say the words I’m using, are very simple, like what a five year old would choose.

What do they say about your cooking?

They tell me my food tastes like home, but when they go home they can’t do it at home. That’s the best compliment my family pays me. That made me felt so great – that they can’t replicate it.

Around Town

What was it like to host the Chef’s Social for Banchet voting?

It went well. For me, I was cooking, and we were able to showcase the hospitality we have as a restaurant. We strive to show guests, even industry folks, what we’re about.

It’s not my food in the beginning because when guests come, it’s the experience they have with the hosts and the servers. I want to please the guests – it’s not about the chef and his ego.

How did Check, Please! go?

Great, but it all happened at the same time – during Restaurant Week. We got slaughtered every day; 200 covers a day during the week and 300 plus on the weekends. Then it was Valentine’s Day. It was crazy – we were going through cases CheckPleaseEmbeyaand cases of things.

Do you like doing Restaurant Week?

We LOVE Restaurant Week! A lot of restaurants don’t see to put out – the whole point is to showcase you can do great food at this price and give great service. To me, it is a challenge; I don’t get into that mindset of just putting up – some people were serving cookies and ice cream! ‘Cookies,’ really?

For two weeks straight we served a menu we were proud of. You can lose your soul when you do banquet food producing at a high rate like that – we skillet cooked each dish. ‘Don’t stop cooking,’ I told my chefs, ‘we don’t just want to serve people food.’

Cooking Lesson

How important is creativity to your process?

Creativity comes sporadically. It can happen when I’m inspired, or bored with a fish, or because something doesn’t sell. You have to take in feedback from the servers, customers, etc. – that’s where a lot of chefs are triggered by their ego. You can’t tell people they have to have it because you think that’s the way it should be. You have to change it; inspiration comes from the day to day.

If I see things elsewhere, it can give me ideas of how to do things. It’s pure, not based on easy, but the creative mind. That’s my goal. If I’m not creative, I’m not teaching my staff. We [chefs] need to be versatile. Sometimes I bring things in whole and then fabricate it myself.

Do you think self-fabrication has grown in recent years?

Yes, you can get anything today and quickly. I have that freedom to order and get things in. Sometimes I play with the product I get; you have to challenge yourself. I won’t say I can’t do anything – I have to try it out.

What have you fabricated most recently?

James [from Buedel] had the three bone plate split in half for me. Then I split it between the bone, so you can get the texture within the short rib where the meat and the tissues hold it together. The meat above the bone is different from the meat at the end of the bone – I wanted people to be able to taste the difference.

In Korean style, they eat bone on and cut it very thin. In Vietnam, we don’t use short ribs because we don’t use that cut. If it’s tough meat, we cook it until it’s tender.

Dang Short Rib (2)What did you make with the split?

Braised Short Rib with Grilled Royal Trumpet, Toasted Garlic, and Roasted Pearl Onions (pictured above). I hate braised meat that’s been seared hard, I find it loses its integrity because it’s already braised – it makes no sense.

We put the meat on a roasting rack with oil, salt, and pepper, and roast it at a high heat (500) for 20 minutes, turn it and roast for another 20. Then we make a braising liquid, add palm sugar, and then deglaze it, make stock and return it to the oven at 350° for one hour and then at 300° for 3 hours. We let it sit overnight in the liquid, so it cools it down, and we reduce the liquid by half.

The next day we baste it, deglaze again, add the royal trumpets, shallots, etc. – we fortify it. In Vietnam you cook in one pot; you should always be able to take a light spoon or fork to it to taste. All in all, it takes one day to make.

Skill Building

What’s your take on education?

When I tried college, I didn’t like it, I was lazy and didn’t have a direction then. Once I choose my path, I decided I wanted to be the best at it …better than my colleagues. I chose to put the work in and I learned so much working with Laurent Gras at L2O.

You have to invest in your craft, read cookbooks, go out and taste flavors. Everybody here has an opportunity; it’s up to you whether you want to be great. You have to set goals, instead of partying after work, getting up late and barely making it to work on time, etc. You have to look at yourself and ask, ‘Are you doing what you should be doing?’ No one is going to do it for you.

I also had to change too; I had to raise my maturity level – it had to be above the rest. I was 27 when we opened Embeya three years ago; now I’m 30. Do you want to do great things or not? It sounds simple, but that’s the reality.

It is a struggle to get cooks who are really ready to cook – their hearts are just not there – you have to have passion for it. I can tell how a cook is going to be just by how they handle herbs, how they set up their station. Cooking schools get them in and out, but they don’t teach them the real world. You’re going to get paid less than your servers and work lots of hours; you have to have dedication to your craft.

Whatever you do, even if you’re just selling tickets, why not make it the best experience you can? Everyone has a choice.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Meat Picks │ 2.11.14

Bac-N-Rama

BaconFestTickets for Baconfest Chicago go on sale next week for the now iconic annual event scheduled for Friday, April 17th & Saturday, the 18th! There will be over 160 chefs and restaurants on hand this year which benefits the Chicago Food Depository.

Buy general admission tickets beginning next Monday, including those for special lunch and dinner events here.

The 20 Second Sell

BuyNowA recent Nielsen post, urges marketers to accept the fact that brand engagement weighs in little (if, at all) with consumers in the big picture of things when it comes to buying.

According to the article, the average online consumer took just 19 seconds to make their purchase, and the majority spent less than 10 seconds. Studies now suggest that buying decisions are made with and without brand names in mind –basically coming down to a proverbial crap shoot at the time of purchase.

For restaurants and like others, the best rule of thumb is to be fresh and consistent with advertising and original content both online and off. Stay visible and don’t expect a coffee klatch over anything you do.

Eataly Kudos

EatalyKudos to Eataly for being named to Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies 2015. Ranked in the 23rd slot of the top 50, Eataly is the highest ranked food company on the list – no easy task when you’re being called out with the likes of Google, HBO and Tesla!

The Facts of Love Valentine'sDay

Americans will buy over 58 million pounds of chocolate and 150 million dollars’ worth of cards and gifts in the name of Valentine’s Day according to the History Channel. For an unromantic (Scrooge-like) look at what does and doesn’t motivate our Valentine rituals, check out Time’s recent post on the matter. Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Put Your Money Where Your Pork Is

What do you do when your brand message teeters fictional? Put Your Money Where Your Pork Is – which is exactly what Chipotle did last month when they discovered one of their pork suppliers failed to meet their highly branded loyalty to animal welfare.

Walk the TalkChipotle

It’s easy to say you “serve only the best”, but how willing are you actually to walk the talk? Chipotle devotes pages of their website to FWI – Food With Integrity. (BOLD, to say the least!) Their written devotion to FWI is so in depth, in fact, one could characterize their marketing mantra as bordering on the obsessive.

When you repeatedly advertise a commitment to finding the very best ingredients raised with respect for the animals, the environment, and farmers, you better be willing to back it up. Chipotle could have easily dealt with the supply chain fail on the QT but opted instead to address it publically – a definite walk the talk move on their part.

When a national chain opts for transparency over liquidity, it’s big (and refreshing) news. Chipotle pulled their pork carnitas from hundreds of their restaurants and posted a sign reading: Sorry, no carnitas. Due to supply constraints, we are currently unable to serve our responsibly raised pork. Trust us, we’re just as disappointed as you, and as soon as we get it back we’ll let the world know. Customer no carnitasloyalty and positive press prevailed pursuant.

Chain Reaction

Another point in Chipotle’s favor was the fact they refused to name the supplier who failed to meet their standards. In lieu of finger pointing, they chose to help bring the supplier’s “operations into compliance.” It was a class move by corporate standards, but not one void of potential other subsequent fallouts.

Whenever your customer takes a public eye hit, a trickle down chain reaction can occur. Such was the case for Niman Ranch, one of the most respected brands in the business and also Chipotle’s largest pork supplier. Was Niman negligent? Certainly not, but those, not in the know would certainly wonder.

Niman prudently followed Chipolte’s lead and spoke publically about it. What ensued was a highly publicized trail of what Niman was doing to help Chipotle get back up to speed in a real time demonstration of what a solid working relationship between merchant and supplier should look like.

NimanThe crux of this public relations issue is deeply attached to what makes meat natural – how animals are raised with respect to their environments if they’re free of growth hormones, antibiotics, etc. When you are committed to honoring sustainable practices, expediency is a non-issue – it takes more time to produce things naturally.

Unlike cows that bear one calf at a time over a 9 + month gestation period, it only takes 3 months, 3 weeks and 3 days for a litter of pigs to be born. 114 days may not seem like a long time, but add to that the amount of time it takes to reach harvest maturity, and it becomes vividly clear how a supply chain gap can quickly sever fluid output.

Moral of the Story

Chipotle’s challenge was twofold: 1) tarnish brand perception by operating outside of message and 2) risk the loss of an ingratiated mass appeal. Offending Millennials, now the biggest consumer population in the U.S., who rank honesty as a top priority, and Chipotle almost just as high, wasn’t worth the risk. Anything but a celeritous and straightforward move could prove fatal for years to come.

The moral of this story is transparency trumps short term gain.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Marketing Menus to Millennials

The big news last week was Millennials are going to take the populous crown from Boomers this year tipping the strength in numbers scale at 75.3 million.

The shift is partially due to a growing death rate among Boomers, down from 78 million to 74.9 million now. Considering the Millennial birth year cut off is 1997 (widely debated at times), the Times reports new growth in the population was achieved by an immigrant influx.

With this news, marketers can finally admonish their begrudged attention to maturity and happy dance their way to uninhibited 18-34 year old demographic bliss –or so they’d like to think.

THE BIG SNAFU

Much has been written about the coveted spending habits of Millennials. Current data-centric marketing trends would have none of us think beyond the digital tracking of who/what/when/where/why this group buys. But all the data collection in the world still can’t trump the unpredictability of human behavior –aka the big snafu.

BBDO graphicBBDO’s now iconic report on Millennial dining habits provides a transparent view on the matter. After an exhaustive survey of over 1,000 Millennials was made, the bottom line came down to one glaring result: the attitudes and behaviors of the demographic are often contradictory “…just like older generations.”

The BBDO SVP, who authored the study, told Media Post they just wanted to find the gaps. “We looked for a big ‘aha,’ but the most interesting part, for us, ended up being the contradictions.”

ASKED & LEARNED

Forbes called out The 11 Restaurants That Need to Cater to Millennials last year based on recent Nielsen studies – not one high-end restaurant was named. Chipolte (#1) and Panera (#2) were ranked as the top Millennial favorites.

Considering that nearly half of the BBDO respondents described themselves as “foodies”, one of the biggest contradictions within this group lays in their devotion to mainstream fast-food –Burger King, McDonald’s, et al. This, combined with an admitted conflict felt by a “top-of-mind” status when it comes to health, further muddles the population’s profile.

One of the most oxymoronic standouts in this group had to do with technology: 88% said they checked their phones at the dinner table, but 44% said they hated it when others did the same. (Classic snafu!) One in seven participants also wanted free Wi-Fi in restaurants.

When it comes to what matters most in how Millennials live their lives, honesty ranked the highest. This makes perfect sense in that Millennials also said they are “much more influenced by their friends’ opinions of a restaurant than by reviews on sites like Yelp.” When their friends make a recommendation, they listen.

Marketers need to take this little gem to heart as it speaks directly to the way social media pipelines and other marketing tools are used. Get the word out and allow the natural flow; running interference is a recipe for disaster.

WRAP UP

Marketing to Millennials, consists of staying on top of trend and sticking to honest policy. Accept the inevitable – human nature will throw a wrench into best campaigns every time.

Where fast food and fast casual may take precedent with the younger set today, Millennials also deem food and eating meals with friends and family as an integral part of their lifestyle. That translates to a solid patronage for years to come.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

 

 

 

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Meat Clips | Mobile, Malware & Mayhem

Recent research provides Android Malware attacks increased 75% last year! Interestingly enough, Adware actually decreased over the same time period, but ransomware hit new highs.

According to the Lookout study, four million Android users paid ransoms that ranged from $300-$500 to unlock their devices last year. Industry analysts fear that some Malware may have infiltrated devices at the factory level and are actually coming pre-loaded as such out of the box.

It’s tough enough to deal with cyber crime on a personal level, but the cost of such mobile mayhem on business is escalating to new heights. More than 68% of global organizations have experienced a breach of mobile security in the last year. Experts cite the lack of password protection, lost or stolen devices, lack of “VPN or firewalled networks” and fraud, as the top mobile security threats on business.

How close to home does all this hit our industry? VERY, according to a recent Independent Restaurateur post which reports restaurants account for 73% of the data breaches in the United States – a 29% increase over the last three years.

Estimates provide the cost to independents can escalate to hundreds of thousands of dollars for just one data breach. Considering that seven out of ten restaurants are independent according to the National Restaurant Association, no business is immune.

It’s tough for anyone trying to maintain a cyber secure environment to conduct business. Worse yet, you could have a system in place, not pay attention to it and face the types of unfathomable financial fallout like Target. (The chain spent $61 million batting clean up in the first 90 days.) Bloomberg Business reports that analysts estimate the retailer’s post-breach costs could “run into the billions”.

Unfortunately, P.F. Chang’s 33-location-breach of consumer credit data may be the tip of the iceberg. Here are five articles you may find helpful on the subject:

How To Prevent Target-like Data Breaches -Fierce Retail IT

Restaurants: How To Fight Back Against Data Thieves -QSR Magazine

Protect Customer’s Information from Security Breaches -Pizza Today

Top Mobile Security Tips -Telegraph

Protect Your Network From Hackers -National Restaurant Association

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn   @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Meat Picks | 12.16.14

The Dawn of New Trends

L20 foodIf you haven’t heard about L20’s “reconcept” yet, check out Chicago Eater’s summative. The famed LEYE Michelin-starred seafood restaurant will close at the end of the year for redesign and reopen next February as Intro.

What makes this particular restaurant close so newsworthy is its next-gen objective: rotating chefs. When Intro opens next year, Rich Mellman, the undisputable Godfather of restaurant entrepreneurialism, will have created one of the freshest concepts to hit the Chicago market in recent years.

“Visiting” chefs will work two to three month stints at the new restaurant. The goal is to bring in top talent who operate at the executive chef level, but don’t have ownership. As Mellman described to Crain’s, “We’re going to introduce some of the bright young chefs in the country to Chicago and introduce chefs to a balanced way to think about business.”

Intro will also be the first LEY restaurant to embrace Tock, the cutting edge restaurant ticketing software developed by Restaurateur, Nick Kokonas of Alinea/Next/Aviary fame. LEY plans to “…initially sell pre-paid tickets, like Next and Alinea, costing between $65 and $95 per dinner, excluding taxes, gratuity and beverages.”

Mellman’s concept has all the makings of a home run if all pans out as expected – LEYE partners will have the opportunity to test new concepts and personnel, up and coming chefs will get the educational and exposure opportunity of a lifetime and customers will delight in a consistent flow of new offerings. The Intro stage is set for an ultimate Win-Win-Win.

It’s All Relativehandshake

In a recent Restaurant News post on How To Create Successful Relationships with Your Food Suppliers, buyers sound off on purchasing relationships.

One restaurant operator describes the procurement relationship “like a marriage” where there’s, “love, hate and everything between”. Another says that just shopping prices aren’t the way to succeed, “…building relationships with suppliers is crucial. If they’re not completely on your side, your product is affected.”

If you look up “relativity”, their sentiments make perfect sense: the state of being dependent for existence on or determined in nature, value or quality by relation to something else.

Limiting the number of suppliers you use, maintaining open communication and negotiable product pricing, are some of the top suggestions offered for building profitable, long-term and trustworthy relationships with your suppliers.

Social Outlooks

social graphicIt’s tough to keep up with the pace of digital media; frequency, relevancy and technology can quickly drive any business owner to drink!

True to the pace, social media marketers are consistently challenged by new tech and rapidly changing media platforms. For example, you can (finally) edit captions on Instagram and Twitter now offers the capability of being able to search every public tweet made since the platform’s inception in 2006 –that one, could be scary.

For more updates on these platforms and others (Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google+), read the Trib’s recent social media outlook post.

P.S. If the thought of dealing with all this “social stuff” stresses you out, check out this Forbes piece on How Successful People Handle Stress – great tips for getting through the holiday season too!

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Meat Picks | 11.6.14

Millenial Mayhem

Last week the NPD Group, a leading industry market research firm, released a study on the latest spend trend findings related to Millennial influence.

Coveted as the sweet spot market niche for everything from tech to tacos, restaurant owners may be surprised to learn where the 18 to 34 year old age group spent most of their $95 billion food bucks for fiscal year ending June 2014.11.6 NPD Chart

Marketers would like to think 25-34-year-old Millennials, settled into careers, buying homes and having children, are devoted to the fast casual category. But according to NPD’s findings, this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

Of the 14 billion restaurant visits made by Millenials in this fiscal time frame, the destination majority weighed in at QSR s (quick service restaurants) across its 18-34-year-old population. While trends do provide an increase in fast casual spending, the number is extremely small when compared to the big picture spend.

Other notes made by the study pointed to voice and expectations. What this 74 million + population says on social media about where they go, and what they found there, remains one of the biggest cursory markers for the industry. Foodservice providers acknowledge brand injury through technology and the power of influence at hand.

Price promos, coupons and loyalty programs are also uber-essential to Millennials because they “expect to be rewarded for their loyalty”, reports NPD. What sets this group above others may be the fact that when their “dining expectations” aren’t met they are, “quick to spread the word.”

Down the road, NPD says growth in this spending segment, “the largest of the six key US generational groups”, will be further spurred by Hispanic influence.

New Fest in Town

11.6 RamenOrganizing Chefs, Bill Kim of bellyQ, Tai Dang of Embeya and Gene Kato of Sumi Rolata Bar appeared on Lunchbreak earlier this week in honor of Ramenfest.

The inaugural event, which debuts this Saturday, will challenge a line-up of 20 local chefs to interpret their take on the classic dish – a polar opposite to the pennywise micro-cook student favorite.

A portion of the proceeds from ticket sales and a planned silent auction will also benefit Common Threads, dedicated to educating children about different cultures through food and art.

The event sold out immediately online, and the Chefs are already hoping to make it bigger and better next year by adding a culinary contest to the mix.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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BUEDEL HONORED WITH GOVERNOR’S EXPORT AWARD

CHICAGO Buedel Fine Meats & Provisions was honored last night with the Governor’s Export Award in the category of New Exporter by the Illinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity (DCEO).

Exports are a vital part of Illinois’ fluid economy and continued economic growth in the State. The Governor’s Export Awards are the State’s highest recognition of export achievement honoring Illinois companies that achieve excellence in exporting and to organizations which provide substantial export assistance to Illinois companies.

The State encourages all Illinois companies and organizations that work to promote Illinois products and services abroad to participate in this awards program.

Award Criteria

Illinois businesses are judged on their activities in the following of cateGovAward6.jpg.pnggories: export sales figures, foreign destinations, history of export activities, company size, products/services, business strategies, solutions and innovations.

Each year a DCEO judging panel reviews applications for this prestigious recognition in 6 categories: New Exporter, Agricultural Business Exporter, Service Exporter, Export Awareness & Development, Exporter of the Year and Exporter Continuing Excellence.

Recipients of the New Exporter award must have no more than three years of activity in foreign markets. Buedel Fine Meats began exporting to Asian and Asian Pacific destinations in 2013.

Thrilled & Honored

Buedel’s VP of Sales, John Cecala and General Manager, Tim Vlcek, accepted the New Exporter Award at a reception which took place last night at the Union League Club of Chicago.GovAward1

Pictured L to R: Adam Pollet, Director Illinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity, John Cecala, Buedel VP of Sales and GM, Tim Vlcek, Daniel Geoff, Deputy Director DCEO.

Cecala credits much of their company’s global strategies to the guidance they received from programs offered by the Illinois Department of Agriculture Marketing, (IDAM) and exposure to international buyers afforded at the National Restaurant Show (NRA).

“Combined with our direct marketing efforts,” Cecala says, “Ag Marketing and the NRA show helped our company successfully develop foreign market initiatives for our products. We are absolutely thrilled and honored to receive this award!”

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From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

 

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Meat Picks | 10.10.14

Chef’s Hall of Fame

The next inductions to the Chef’s Hall of Fame will take place at Castle Nightclub on Thursday, October 16th at the annual fund raising benefit for the Chicago Culinary Museum.2014CulinaryHallofFame

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year’s honorees are:

Chef of the Year, Chef Stephanie Izard –Chef/Partner Girl & the Goat, The Goat, James Beard award winner, Top Chef Season 4 winner and cookbook author.

Pastry Chef of the Year, Chef Gale Gand –Former Food Network Sweet Dreams host, cookbook author, James Beard award winner, co-owner of TRU and the newly opened Spritz Burger.

Industry Leader, Phil Stefani –Restaurateur of more than 15 restaurants and private event venues including: Tuscany, Riva, Crystal Gardens, Chango Loco, Navy Pier Beer Garden, Castaways, The Grand Ballroom at Navy Pier, Phil Stefani’s 437 Rush, Phil Stefani Signature Events and Tavern on Rush.

Legendary Chef, Chef Michael Kornick –Chef/Partner DMK Restaurants: DMK Burger Bars, Fish Bar, Ada Street, County Barbecue, DMK Burger & Fish and Henry’s Swing Club.

Industry Legend, Larry Levy –Founder of Levy Restaurants, an internationally recognized specialized food service organization with market leading share of high-end sports and entertainment facilities throughout North America and Europe and network of restaurants.

25 local restaurants will be serving at the event, which also includes an open bar, DJ and silent auction. (Buedel Fine Meats is proudly donating a shopping spree to our online store for the auction.) There’s still time to buy tickets here.

Book Virgin

VH ChicagoIt is official, Virgin Hotels Chicago is now taking reservations for 2015. From the iconic messaging, “calling them rooms is like calling the Space Shuttle an airplane” (they call them chambers), to the dedicated Step Outside pages on their website filled with food, attractions and stores to see outside of the hotel, VH Chicago is in full marketing mode.

Located in the heart of the Chicago Loop, the hotel took over the 27 story Dearborn Bank Building on the corner of Wabash & Lake –Virgin also restored and recreated the architectural features of the historic 1928 Art Deco landmark.

VH Chicago2The impending roster of food and spirits is equally inviting: Miss Ricky’s (American diner), Two Zero Three (coffee and wine bar), Common’s Club (a breakfast, lunch and dinner social club where “everyone’s a member”) and The Rooftop Bar.

We wish all the best to Virgin Hotels Chicago and Executive Chef Rick Gresh.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn   @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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It’s Okay to Chew the Fat!

BigFatSurprise2Have you heard about “The Big Fat Surprise” yet? It’s a new book which takes to task over a half century’s worth of bad fat rap.

Pursuant to nine years of trailing the research and conducting expert interviews, author Nina Teicholz’s challenging revelations on Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet is rattling the cage of many a diet guru and medical pundit.

Good Fat/Bad Fat

An independent investigative journalist, Teicholz relentlessly pursued a tedious journey of facts and fiction which began with a post-World War II rise in heart disease in America. Triggered in part by President Eisenhower’s 1955 heart attack, a WSJ review recounts Teicholz’s tracking of (government backed and tainted) clinical study results which were irrevocably embraced by the media and echoed forward by food manufacturers.

Teicholz describes the trail of historical data as “the blood sport of nutrition science” suggesting that decades of scientists would use extreme measures to shield their findings over contradictory others. Some of Teicholz’s provocative conclusions include:

* The health benefits of eating red meat high in saturated fat outweigh the benefits of eating lean red meat with less saturated fat.

* Red Meat is the only food which improves good HDL cholesterol levels

* Diets which are void of the saturated fats in meat, eggs and dairy have ultimately increased carbohydrate consumption thus contributing to diabetes and obesity

As you can imagine, contemporary proponents of cardiovascular health are quick to contradict. In a CNN interview, Doc du Jour, Dean Ornish, professes, “If you eat a diet that is high in animal protein, your risk of dying from everything goes up considerably. If you eat a plant-based diet, which is naturally low in fats and refined carbs, a whole foods plant-based diet, the disease risk decreases.”

Industry pub, Meating Place, notes that Teichholz’s book comes at a time when the 2015 issue of the DGA (Dietary Guidelines for Americans) is looming in the wings. Interestingly enough, no less than 20 government agencies (see the full list here) legislate and rely upon the DGA.

The odds of reversing current DGA guidelines from low intake of saturated fat echoed further (and lower) by the American Heart Association by next January are pretty slim.

Food for Thought

Ornish also says Teicholz’s book is “dangerous” because it tells “people what they want to hear.” And there’s the AMEN moment –who doesn’t want to eat bacon with great abandon?

You can’t help but wonder if the Atkins Diet wasn’t closer to the mark than decades of critics would have us think. Everyone I’ve ever known who tries it loses weight quickly—but as soon as they stop “doing Atkins,” they gain it all back.

Where swapping out sugar for fat may be a great accelerant for weight loss, it still always comes down to balance. Low fat, doesn’t mean no fat, and bacon, will always rule!

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Quality Doesn’t Cost, It Pays

9.8Foodstuff IndexWe’re all paying more for food now than we did last year. According to a recent report by Bloomberg’s Chase van der Rhoer, food prices are up 19% from December of last year. In the meat industry, we’ve seen as much as 44% food cost inflation since 2012 on many popular cuts.

At the same time, average base pay increases for 2014 will remain at 3 percent for the second year in a row in the U.S.—roughly one percentage point below pre-recession levels, according to the seventh annual Compensation Planning Survey by Buck Consultants.

The dichotomy of faster food price escalation over wages presents major challenges for restaurateurs. How do you maintain profits with food costs escalating faster than your customer’s disposable income?

Quality Costs Customers

Restaurant patrons are faced with paying higher prices—myself included. I’m much more discerning about where I spend my money now. I want quality, and a dining experience that satisfies me—that makes me feel my hard earned money was well spent. People want to walk out of a restaurant saying, “We’d come back here!” no matter if it’s fast casual or fine dining.

Some of my favorite local restaurants have cut the quality on their food to deal with higher food costs this year. As a customer, it’s disappointing to me. I find myself saying, ‘No, let’s not go there. It’s not as good as it used to be.’ I’d rather spend a little more money and go to a place where I walk away feeling satisfied and delighted.

What gives customers that, ‘come back’ feeling? It’s a combination of great service and great quality food. When I have a bad experience with the service, but the food is delicious, I’m much more forgiving than when I have bad food experience. When the food quality is poor or less than what I expected, I’m hesitant to go back. Sure nobody’s perfect and there are times when something goes wrong, but if I give the place another try and I have the same poor quality food experience, I’m done—cross that place off my list.

How do you feel when you dine out and are met with disappointment?

How Quality Pays

9.8Quality EffectWhen buyers opt for lowest prices despite quality, customer experience problems often begin. Quality ultimately reduces costs and builds customer loyalty. While that’s hard to measure on comparative bid sheets, there are many studies that prove quality pays in the long run.

In the 1979 book, Quality is Free, author Philip B. Crosby explains the idea of understanding the true “cost of poor quality,” by illustrating out how much it really costs to do things badly. Crosby demonstrates the cost of bad quality is inevitably more than the higher costs of good quality from the onset.

Every dollar you don’t spend on making up for poor quality becomes a dollar right to your bottom line. In the food service industry, every dollar you don’t spend to comp a meal, replace spoilage or decrease yields on finished goods from cheaper products, are dollars going straight to your bottom line.

Good quality increases income by attracting more customers and repurchase probabilities. At the same time, good quality lowers costs by elimination of lost business, rework and waste. Some studies show that implementing quality-focused programs can increase profits by 5%-10% of sales. Quality is not only free; it pays.

Quality is Relative to Consistency

What most restaurant patrons look for is consistency. When it comes to food, consistency starts with the quality of the products purchased. They can be consistently good in quality, consistently bad in quality, or inconsistent in quality. When food is purchased consistently good or consistently bad, the result is predictable. The worst scenario is when there is inconsistent quality.

Inconsistent quality usually stems from shopping for the lowest price and being fooled by the promise of quality. We see this every day in the supply side of the food service industry. Potential customers send out bid sheets with generic descriptions of the products they want prices on like, “GROUND BEEF” or “CHOICE FILET—ben franklin28 OZ”, and then often buy the lowest bid. This is why shopping the ‘exact same item’ is so important; not all ‘GROUND BEEF’ or ‘CHOICE FILET—8 OZ’ are the same.

Any purveyor can quote a low price week to week using lower quality products to win the bid. But in the end, what do low quality, lower bid winning products really do for your restaurant? They deliver inconsistency and ultimately damage future returns.

Increase Quality & Consistency

Quality Doesn’t Cost, It Pays! was a tag line a friend of mine had painted on his produce trucks. I love this expression because it speaks directly to successful food cost management. Here are four cost savvy tips you can use to help increase quality and consistency:

  • Survey your staff. What does your wait staff hear from your guests about the food quality and consistency? What do your chefs and line cooks say about the quality of the food they prep?
  • Check your garbage. How much and what kind of foodstuffs are in your back of the house garbage? Low priced/Low quality food often spoils faster, has more waste and less yield. How much uneaten food are your bussers clearing off the table? Were your guests less hungry than they thought, or less happy with the quality of their meal?
  • Be specific and finite with your purchase specifications. Cite brand names or sources, specific quality grades and origins.
  • Work with suppliers that care about quality as much as you do. Define what quality means to you and how you measure it. If your suppliers don’t understand your true objectives, their guestimates can introduce inconsistent quality.

Paying a lower vendor price versus a higher one seems like a beneficial move—but the critical comparative here is that the purchase is for the exact same item. Look beyond price and focus on quality to improve your bottom line. You will reap positive results in the long run and be glad you did.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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5 Ways to Tell if Your Rep is an Order Taker or a Value Provider

Risky contractSales representatives (still) play in an important role in our economy. Outside of self-serve sales, they facilitate transactions between buyers and sellers—they are the glue that binds tech, info, action and service together today. Yet most of us dread getting calls and emails from sales people for fear they’ll try to sell us something.

The big question is: Are you getting true value from your sales rep or mere transactions?

Sales Call, Line 2

Unfortunately, a lot of the bad rap came from the telemarketing industry. The statistical geniuses laid out a success plan for the ratio of outbound calls to sales results: the more people you call on will eventually lead to a sale. The funny thing is direct mail had been doing this for years. Send out enough pieces in mass, and you’ll get the coveted 2% return—on a good day. Something always sticks to the wall.

Companies rushed to hire banks of telemarketers armed with auto-dialers to plow through terabytes of databases in a non-stop effort to reach as many people as possible with their spiel. Consumers were bombarded with solicitation calls, usually beginning with the dinner hour and continuing throughout the evening.

It’s been about 10 years now since the Do Not Call Registry provided consumers with the ability to put an end to nuisance sales calls. That, combined with today’s digital channels, has all but put an end to telemarketing sales—unless you’re a charity seeking donations or an existing service provider (banks, credit cards, insurance) calling on your customers to offer them additional products and services.

At work, we’re called on by business-to-business (B2B) sales reps wanting to sell us something they believe will help our business. How many voice mails do you get each week from someone wanting a minute of your time to tell you about the benefits of their product or service? How many of those calls do you return? My guess is almost none of them.

When You Want a Call

When you have a need and want to buy something to meet that need, who do you want to talk to? That’s right, a sales rep …really? Yes, of course, you do, because it’s on your terms and not the other way around.

Ironically, even when we’re open to dialog with a sales rep we do so reluctantly assuming we’ll have to endure the pitch process to get to the information we really want—just a simple answer to our question.

Such reluctance stems from past experience with less than professional (just plain bad) sales reps who don’t listen and never shut up. They are the sales types who smother us with a spiel of what they assume we want and how great their company is. Sales reps worth their weight in gold (true professionals) don’t do this. They earn the trust of their customers first—they are the reps people want to do business with.

Good Rep/Bad Rep

The differences between the types of reps you want to do business with and the kind you don’t is simpler to spot than you may think. Here are the 5 top things to look for when seeking value providers vs. order takers:

1. They do their homework before they meet with you

Professional sales people who deliver real value take the time to do their research on you and/or your company. They spend time understanding your business to be able to explain the benefits of their product or service as it relates to your business.

In our business, we help chefs and restaurateurs with fine meat programs tailored to fit their needs. We take the time to learn as much as we can about our customers and prospects by studying their menus, eating at their venues, reading their customer reviews online and more. When we do our homework first, we can have more meaningful conversations with our customers about their business.

Reps who do their homework make better use of your valuable time and streamline the path to meeting your needs. If a sales rep opens the conversation with something like “…tell me about your business,” they probably didn’t do their homework beforehand.

2. They listen first and talk second

We set our aim to abide by the following expression at Buedel Fine Meats: We have two ears and one mouth for a reason. Meaning, we should listen more than speak.

Professional sale reps deliver real value when they listen first. They ask quality questions (sincerely) about your needs and seek comprehension of your goals before talking about their company. They want to know what drives your company’s needs, your decision making process, how you’ll know if your needs are met, and so on.

Value based sales reps know they must demonstrate how their product or service could benefit you in the context of your needs. The only way for them to do this is by listening first. Of course, there is an appropriate time for the sales rep to do all the talking so you can understand how their product or service can meet your needs, but if a rep is talking more than listening first, it’s a sign they’re putting their commission before your needs.

3. They make it safe and earn your trust

Professionals who deliver real value create a safe environment for you and they work to earn your trust. What I mean by a ‘safe environment’ is they create an atmosphere of accommodation without risk. Value adding sales reps accommodate your needs, not theirs. They work with you on your terms, not theirs. They follow your buying process, not their selling process.

Most sales people are under pressure to make sales, but the sales reps that add real value accommodate you without risk. An example of risk would be something like “… you have to buy it today, or the deal is gone.” Really? I doubt it. Earning your trust involves avoiding ultimatums and high pressure tactics.

We generally prefer to do business with people we know and like—we give them our trust because we find it safe to do so. Earning your trust is a process, not an event. Professional sales reps who add value know how to earn your trust and create a safe, no-risk environment to do business with you.

4. They say, “No” and frame it

Quality sales reps expect a long-term relationship with you. They understand that after they’ve earned your trust and your business there should be more business with you down the road. They also know that saying “yes” to everything you ask for, want or need is virtually impossible to deliver on. Conversely, they have the intelligence to say “no” when necessary to avoid purchase disappointments—in reality, they tell the truth.

The best value providers don’t just say “no” when they know their company will be unable to deliver on something, they also frame it with reasons why and propose “yes” alternatives. This gives you, as a buyer, an understanding of what and why they are able to do things and the opportunity to consider buying alternatives.

When you get what you expect, you’re happy. When you don’t, you feel like you’ve been taken.   Professional value based sales reps say, “no” with alternative ways to say “yes” so that you get what you expect.

5. They follow up in a timely manner

Probably the most important attribute of all that distinguishes a value provider from a transactional one is that they follow up in a timely manner. How frustrating is it to you when you’re under deadlines to get things done, and you can’t because you’re waiting and waiting for someone to follow up with you? Very frustrating!

All of us from time to time forget things, lose track of a to-do or without intention let something slip between the cracks. That’s human nature. However, if lack of follow-up by your sales rep is the norm rather than the exception, he/she is not bringing value to your relationship.

True pros are responsive in a timely manner. If they promise to get you an answer to your question by tomorrow, they get your answer by tomorrow, not next week or next month. They do what they say they are going to do. They return your phone calls and emails within a reasonable time frame. They realize that your time is valuable and when you need something it’s important to you. If they can’t follow up in a timely manner personally, they coordinate someone else following up for you on their behalf because you’re important to them.

Wrap Up

Reps who do their homework, listen first, work to earn your trust, avoid false promises and consistently follow up with you in a timely manner are professional value providers. Order Takers are often unprepared, like listening to themselves talk and will say anything to get the sale.

Who would you rather do business with?

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Meat Picks | 8.21.14

Menu Mayhem

esq-big-boy-081611-xlgAuthor William Poundstone’s four year old book, Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value (and How To Take Advantage of It), is causing a new ruse for the hospitality community. Restaurant News penned a digital lead to a story published in the Daily Mail about it this week and the Food Network also blogged about it.

At task for restaurateurs, is a big reveal on what customers should keep an eye out for on menus—specifically spilling the beans on menu marketing tactics used by many restaurants and why.

One of the main points highlighted in both write ups, cites a 2009 study which showed that leaving the dollar sign off listed menu prices encouraged an 8% spend increase among customers. Which is why, as the UK press put it, “Pound signs are disappearing from menus as quickly as cod are vanishing from the oceans.”

Other coverage highlights included points on why certain items are set off in boxes on menus and why “specials of the day” really aren’t that special at all.

This is definitely one of those posts that any business cringes over. No company wants to advertise why they do or don’t include certain wording or aesthetics in things they publish for public consumption whether it be menus, ads, websites, etc.

Certainly, no one wants a server to say, “I’m going to try to up sell you right now,” right before they suggest more drinks, appetizers or dessert. Consumers are savvy—they understand the art of the deal. (They often try to use it to their advantage too.) Things like this needn’t be spelled out in neon.

Fests & Feasts

sausagefestThe bad news is summer is winding down. The good news is there are still some great festivals left on the calendar. Here a few:

Sausage Fest Chicago kicks off tomorrow at 5 pm in a new location, at St. Michael’s on N. Cleveland Ave. in Old Town and runs through Sunday.

What makes this event a stellar stand out is its “Sausage King of Chicago” competition. Contestants vie for the crown by raising money for charity—this year, for the Wounded Warrior Project. The contestant who raises the most donations for the cause is crowned king. In addition to the royal title, the winner also gets prizes and free food and drink throughout the festival weekend.

BashWabashLogo-300x284Also this weekend, the 11th anniversary of Bash on Wabash takes place between 13th Street and 14th Place on Wabash in the South Loop. The festival offers music, food, drink, vendor booths, arts and crafts, and is jam packed with lots of kid activities, including a 5k Run and 10 mile Bike.

Bash on Wabash brings neighbors and business together to benefit the GSLA (Greater South Loop Association) with a portion of the proceeds going to the South Loop Food Pantry.

Find more festival dates at Time Out Chicago.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website  LinkedIn  @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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Retaining Pride & Passion in a Conglomerate World

Companies make acquisitions for a number of reasons; often to gain new market share, intellectual property, additional products and new revenue streams. Most of the time however, mergers and acquisitions are driven by a desire for higher stock prices under shareholder pressure.

We’ve seen plenty of consolidations in the food industry over the past year. The largest pork producer, Smithfield Foods, sold to the Chinese group, Shuanghui, Sysco is acquiring US Foods, Hillshire Brands moved to acquire Pinnacle Foods and then Tyson is acquiring Hillshire Brands.                                                        meat-knife-colorado-premium 

Lost in Transition

Acquired companies frequently lose their identity when they’re “synergized” into the large acquiring companies. (That’s code for grabbing the customers, products and profits while eliminating everything else that already exists within the acquiring company.) In essence, much of what made the acquired company valuable in the first place is tossed out, ultimately forcing the customer base into a commoditized system of doing business.

The not so synergistic trail has played out more than several times over in the meat industry. In recent years, privately held Chicago meat companies have been gobbled up by multi channel food industry companies. US Foods [now being acquired by Sysco as noted above] bought privately held Stockyards Packing and New City Meats and Allen Brothers was acquired by Chef’s Warehouse, a publically traded specialty foods distributor.

What would happen if two family run meat companies combined?

Buedel & CPF

Up until now, privately held meat companies have been largely acquired by food conglomerates with multiple lines of business. We are excited to share news of just the opposite: Colorado Premium Foods, a privately held family run fine meats processor, has acquired Buedel.

Buedel Fine Meats & Provisions will now operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of Colorado Premium (CPF). Other than the change in entityPicture1 backing of our company, Buedel Fine Meats continues to operate with business as usual – abiding by our commitment to listen to our customers first, and deliver premium quality meats with professional services.

This marriage makes Buedel Fine Meats stronger than ever and gives us increased size, scale and capacity to continue to develop new offerings, expand into new markets and lead by example into the future.

Our profile now provides:

  • A complimentary customer base to serve larger multi-concept owners
  • Additional product lines, with more buying power benefits to our customers
  • Geographical expansion of the distribution footprint for both companies
  • Mutual growth potential to reach new customers with our value nationally
  • Additional capacity to support growth in both businesses across geographic markets

Wrap Up

Retaining value is a top priority for Buedel and CPF. Our respective customers will not experience the pitfalls of commodity service but gain the opportunity to reap new benefits from a combined product and resource pool solely dedicated to fine meats.

Unlike many of the acquisitions before us, Buedel will continue to operate with pride and passion in a conglomerate world – merging old world family traditions with the best modern practices of today.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

About CPF: Colorado Premium Foods is a family run, privately held premier value added manufacturer of premium beef products focused on serving major U.S. retailers, restaurant chains and co-packing of specialty items for packers across the nation. Colorado Premium custom processes over 100 million pounds of beef annually, operates 2 production and 2 storage facilities with approximately 500 employees and over 100 customers nationwide.                                               Read more at: www.coloradopremium.com

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Meat Picks | 7.31.14

Book It Now!

TasteofNation2014The annual Taste of the Nation fund raising event dedicated to ending child hunger will be held on Wednesday, August 13th in the Navy Pier ballroom. Bill Rancic will be this year’s MC, along with close to 100 restaurant professionals who will be donating their time, talents, food and libations to the event. Buy tickets online.

Ill-Mobile Manners

Did you see the one about the restaurant that claims ill-mannered cell phone use is at the root of many lackluster reviews?

When a NYC venue felt they were on the bad end of way too many negative online reviews, they hired consultants to investigate the situation. A comparison of 2004 vs. 2014 surveillance tapes provided a new view of the entire siturestaurant cell phoneation.

The restaurant found that customer cell phone activities delayed and interrupted the flow of restaurant service from the point of arrival through departure of the premises. A spike in food return was tracked to customers who were too busy playing around with their phones to eat their food when it arrived. They sent their plates back to the kitchen for being cold and ultimately wrote unfavorable reviews online.

Delays in ordering and waiter assisted selfies, were some of the other disruptions attributed to cell phone use. Read all the gory details here.

Coming to the Mag Mile

Congrats to Alpana Singh, Master Sommelier and proprietor of The Boarding House on the new construction underway of her next venture. Seven Lions, will be an “American clubhouse” based in a comfortable atmosphere across the street from the Art Institute in the People’s Gas Building at 122 S. Michigan Ave. The opening date is currently being projected for the end of this year or early 2015. Good luck, Alpana!

Shake Shack2Also coming to Michigan Avenue (at Madison), a popular east coast chain that just made its way to the Windy City, Shake Shack. News broke earlier this week, amidst current renovation of its first location at Ohio & Rush (opening this fall) that the Shack will be adding a second location sometime early next year at the ground floor of the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel according to the Trib.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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How Taste & Flavor Affect Your Beef Experience | Part II

TASTESFLAVORSIn Part 1 of our article, we examined what factors affect the way we perceive the taste and flavor of beef. (Remember, flavor is the quality of something you can taste.) We also talked about how beef with higher marbling (intramuscular fat) usually wins the taste test.

There are certain cuts of beef which may be more marbled than others and/or more tender. There are also ways of adding more flavor to beef with Marinades, Rubs and Brines and also increase tenderness.

Adding More Flavor

Marinade is a seasoned liquid that adds flavor and in some cases increases tenderness. Less tender beef cuts, such as several from the chuck, round, flank and skirt, benefit from a marinade with tenderizing ingredients such as food acids or enzymes combined with a long marinating time of 6 to 24 hours.

Tender beef cuts are marinated only to add flavor and, therefore, require short marinate times – 15 minutes to 2 hours. Less acidic marinade ingredients should be used since their tenderizing effects are not required.

Acidic marinade ingredients Marinadeinclude citrus juices, vinegar, vinaigrettes, salsa, yogurt and wine. Fresh ginger, pineapple, papaya, kiwi and figs, also contain natural tenderizing enzymes.

A highly acidic marinade can actually toughen meat fibers similar to overcooking.

Rubs are dry or paste-type seasoning mixtures used for flavoring applied to the surfaces of roasts, steaks and ground beef patties just prior to cooking, they often form a delicious crust during cooking.

Dry rubs consist of herbs, spices and other seasonings that are pressed onto the beef’s surface. Paste-type rubs are spread over the beef and use small amounts of wet ingredients, such as oil, crushed garlic, mustard, soy sauce and Worcestershire sauce, to bind the dry seasonings.

Cures & Brines rely on salt mixtures/solutions. For dry cures, salt and sodium nitrate are applied directly to the beef’s surface. Beef is also cured by immersing it in pickling or brining solutions that may or may not contain nitrates.

Originally developed as a form of meat preservation, these methods are mainly used to produce distinctive flavors, such as in corned beef and pastrami today.

Flavor Pairings

When beef is paired with two or more uEpic Burgermami tastes, it creates an explosion of savory, delicious flavors in your mouth.

Popular umami accoutrements to beef are aged cheeses, bacon, barbeque sauce, mushrooms, garlic, onions, red wine, soy sauce, and tomatoes.  Burgers are highly indicative of this practice – cheese and bacon are among the most preferred toppers today. (Pictured above left: Epic Burger)

Less Than Perfect Flavors

There may be times when you experience less than desirable beef flavor. Some of the terms I’ve heard used to describe this are, “livery”, “irony” and “warmed over”. Here are some tips on what you can do to avoid these situations.

Livery Flavor in beef is a complex occurrence without one clear cause, but there are ways to minimize livery flavors. 1. Red blood cells contain iron which has notes of liver flavor. A proper purge of blood during processing will help remedy the situation. 2. Avoid too much aging. Beef does become more flavorful and tender with age, but too much age can also cause a liver flavor. One reason may be that fat oxidizes during the aging process and the affects of oxidation appear to accentuate the liver flavor. If possible, avoid cooking to a high degree of doneness.

Irony Flavor or a Metallic mouth feel or iron taste is attributed to high myoglobin and hemoglobin contents which release iron during cooking. This off-flavor may be reduced by cooking beef to a lower degree of doneness.

takeoutcontainerWarmed Over Flavor occurs from reheating previously cooked meat. (Like when you reheat that doggie bagged steak in the microwave from last night’s dinner.) This undesirable flavor is caused by cooking to a high degree of doneness, improper storage, microbial contamination and exposure of cooked meat to oxygen. Consider having leftovers cold in sandwiches or salads to help minimize the problem.

Flavor Wrap

The taste of beef can be enhanced. Here are our top five flavor tips for getting the most out of your next meal:

1. Choose higher grades of beef, USDA Prime or USDA Choice, that have more marbling  (the marbling score is a large factor in determining the beef quality grade)

2. Opt for Properly Aged beef – anywhere between 14-28 days depending on the cut

3. Keep your beef properly chilled under 40°F until cooking and avoid freezing/thawing

4. Avoid cooking to a high degree of doneness and reheating

5. Experiment with complimentary umami flavors to create a flavor explosion.

Enjoy the taste of beef and savor the flavor!

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

 

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How Taste & Flavor Affect Your Beef Experience | Part I

CreekstoneBeeffiletThe words taste and flavor are commonly used interchangeably to describe eating sensation but in reality they are very different. Appearance, smell, and personal judgment can also affect our beef experience. (Pictured right: Creekstone Farms Filet.)

Triggers & Sensations

If you were in grade school before the late 1990’s, you learned about the basic taste receptors on your tongue for sweet, salty, sour and bitter. In the late 1990’s a fifth taste receptor was confirmed as umami which is the way our body interprets and senses protein or savory taste.

Receptors on our tongue send signals to our brains when we experience certain tastes. The ability to detect these five tastes is instrumental to our decision making. We may decide something is too bitter, or nicely sweet, and then decide to keep eating it or to avoid it in the future.

How our innate survival instinct relates to our taste sensors directing us towards certain foods and away from others is further important. For example, sweet indicates energy-giving carbohydrates; sour indicates potential danger from spoilage; bitter indicates potential toxins.

Flavor is the quality UmamiTongueof something you can taste. It is the combination of the taste, plus the other sensations that influence our perception of food, such as aroma, texture, juiciness, color and feel in your mouth.

People sometimes use words such as, rich, buttery, silky, pungent and earthy, when describing something they eat or drink. When doing so, they are actually speaking of flavor. You may have used the term “off-flavor” when something didn’t taste quite right. That’s because the combination of taste and the other influences were not what you expected or experienced before.

Beef + Fat = Flavor

Beef without fat lacks flavor. Fat imparts juiciness and flavor in beef but all fat with meat is not equal. There are three types of fat in meat:

  • Subcutaneous or External fat that covers the outside of a carcass
  • Seam or Intermuscular fat that runs between muscles
  • Marbling or Intramuscular fat that is found within muscles

Marbling is the visible flecks of fat within muscles that are directly related to the flavor and juiciness of cooked beef. Marbling affects flavor in two ways. First, fatty acids (the building blocks of fat) experience chemical changes during cooking and produce potent flavor compounds. Second, fat acts as a container for aromatic compounds that are released during cooking. Many beef flavor components are found in these aromatic compounds.

There are ten degrees BeefFlavorBlogof marbling USDA graders use for evaluation, from Very Abundant to Practically Devoid. The marbling score is a large factor in determining the beef quality grade.   USDA Prime has the most abundant marbling, USDA Select has the least marbling and USDA Choice is right in the middle.

Part 1 Wrap Up

Our eating and flavor preferences can be altered by the ways we see, smell, taste and even think about foods. In a study conducted by the University of Nebraska, consumer opinion was put to the test with steak:

70% of respondents visually preferred low marbled steaks, but high marbled steaks were rated juicier, more flavorful and taste acceptable.

What’s most interesting about this result is the inertia between a visual and actual taste. By sight, lower marbled steaks may have been perceived as the better alternative, but it was the flavor profile of higher marbled steak that won out.

From a market perspective, grain fed beef tends to have more marbling whereas grass fed beef tends to have less marbling. Consequently the flavor of the beef is quite different.

Read on: How Taste & Flavor Affect Your Beef Experience Part II 

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook 

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Meat Picks | 7.9.14

New Food Show

CNBCA new CNBC show called, Restaurant Startup premiered this week, where famed Master Chef Judge, Joe Bastianich, and renown Chef Tim Love compete against each other investing (their own money) in restaurant concepts they think will hit it big.

Casting for the show (ala Shark Tank) is ongoing: www.restaurantstartupcasting.com. You may also appreciate this video segment Bastianich did with an established NYC restaurateur on survival in the restaurant industry.

Tenderloin in Taiwan

image003 image001The global food market is ever expansive and Taiwan is booming. Last month, a record 7,400 international buyers (up 13% from 2013) visited over 3,900 booths at the Taipei International Food Expo, which took place over four days at the end of June. The core sections of the expo were: food, food industry machinery and packaging, hospitality, laundry and halal markets.

According to Austrade.gov US Beef is considered higher quality in Taiwan and has a “special grade” rating, as opposed to other beef imports classified as a “general grade”. The quality of meat also determines where it is sold. US Beef is usually sold to Western cuisine restaurants and contemporary supermarkets. Tenderloin, Rib Eye, Strip Loin and Short Ribs are some of the most favored cuts in Taiwan. (Pictured: Buedel Fine Meats on display by Tzy Yao at the Taipei Expo last month.)

Shmooze Date

Thursday, August 7th is the next date for the free industry networking event at Drink in Schuamburg, organized by Food Industry News. The featured speaker at the event will be Rich Labriola, founder of Labriola Bakery Cafe and the most recently opened Chicago version of, Stan’s Donuts. All food industry professionals are welcome.

Magic KISS

Paul-Stanley-and-Gene-Simmons-of-KISS-Venue-friendly-Rock-Brews-RestaurantYou have to respect the marketing prowess of KISS legends Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley. They have over 3,000 licensed merchandised items and Simmons has built a highly successful multi-faceted empire across the entertainment, hospitality and financial industries for the last forty years.

Four years ago this summer, Stanley, Simmons and three other friends (Restaurateur, Michael Zislis and Rock & Roll Magnates, Dell and Dave Furano) came up with the idea for the restaurant chain Rock & Brews. With locations in California, New Mexico, Hawaii, Kansas and Mexico, the ever expanding brand announced it will also be going into arenas and stadiums opening its first “venue-friendly” location at the StubHub Center in Carson, CA., this summer.

Love KISS or not, you can’t dismiss this perfect parody of food, music and marketing.

Deal of the Day

10488075_759259007448679_8136965851066997891_nGreat hump day deal on “Fried Chicken Wednesdays” at Takito Kitchen. Enjoy $3 fried chicken tacos (sesame or crispy) on a hot sauce tortilla, with cheddar, herb aioli and avocado lettuce. TK also has a Farm to Table Prix Fixe Dinner and offers a Farm to Table Brunch every Friday through Sunday.

From the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

 

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Meat Picks | 6.26.14

Ed’s Fest

ED Debevic FlyerMake a note of this date: Saturday, July 26th. You’re all invited to a party at Ed Debevic’s from 11-5, for a luau-themed food and fun fest for the whole family. What makes this (fifth) annual event extra special this year, is Ed’s 30th Anniversary! Hard to believe it’s already been three decades since Debevic’s has been open.

For those of us around (way back in 1984), Ed Debevic’s was an immediate hit. Their shakes, burgers, retro diner setting and wildly entertaining wait staff exploded onto the casual dining scene. People just loved it – and they still do today. What’s not to love about a “cheap and deep” menu?

Don’t miss Ed’s 30th Anniversary on July 26th! A portion of the party proceeds goes to local charities too!

Best Burger in the Nation

1-kuma-flickr_RLeeThe Daily Meal expanded their annual perfect patty list from 40 to a whopping 101 Best Burgers in America earlier this month. The top slot went to Kuma’s Corner in Chicago for their signature Kuma Burger complete with: bacon, sharp cheddar, lettuce, tomato, onion and a fried egg. As The Daily Meal put it, “It’s not as though there’s not enough flavor in the burger, but that egg… whoah.”

Gadget Giveaway

TailgaterTailgater Monthly is running a sweepstakes you might be interested in. They’re giving away $5,700 worth of outdoor tools, equipment and accessories you can use for barbeque and parties at home and on the go – everything from a compact portable generator to a floating cooler. Entry to the contest is free via online registration good through tomorrow, 6/27.

Fixin’ for the Fourth

carwfish boilLooking for something different to do on the 4th? How about a Crawfish Boil at Shaw’s? For $30, you can get an all-you-can-eat Louisiana style crawfish boil with potatoes, sausage and corn fixins’ from 12-9 on July 4th.

Find a complete list of July festivals and concerts at Time Out Chicago.

Post of the Week

Do you love this Facebook post from Niman Ranch as much as we do?

Post of the WeekFrom the desk of John Cecala || Website LinkedIn @BuedelFineMeats  Facebook

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